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Age-related differences in agenda-driven monitoring of format and task information

Mitchell, Karen J. ; Ankudowich, Elizabeth ; Durbin, Kelly A. ; Greene, Erich J. ; Johnson, Marcia K.

Neuropsychologia, Oct, 2013, Vol.51(12), p.2427(15) [Tạp chí có phản biện]

ISSN: 0028-3932

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  • Nhan đề:
    Age-related differences in agenda-driven monitoring of format and task information
  • Tác giả: Mitchell, Karen J. ; Ankudowich, Elizabeth ; Durbin, Kelly A. ; Greene, Erich J. ; Johnson, Marcia K.
  • Chủ đề: Visual Perception
  • Là 1 phần của: Neuropsychologia, Oct, 2013, Vol.51(12), p.2427(15)
  • Mô tả: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.01.012 Byline: Karen J. Mitchell, Elizabeth Ankudowich, Kelly A. Durbin, Erich J. Greene, Marcia K. Johnson Keywords: Source memory; Aging; Reflective attention; Agenda-driven processing Abstract: Age-related source memory deficits may arise, in part, from changes in the agenda-driven processes that control what features of events are relevant during remembering. Using fMRI, we compared young and older adults on tests assessing source memory for format (picture, word) or encoding task (self-, other-referential), as well as on old-new recognition. Behaviorally, relative to old-new recognition, older adults showed disproportionate and equivalent deficits on both source tests compared to young adults. At encoding, both age groups showed expected activation associated with format in posterior visual processing areas, and with task in medial prefrontal cortex. At test, the groups showed similar selective, agenda-related activity in these representational areas. There were, however, marked age differences in the activity of control regions in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex and lateral parietal cortex. Results of correlation analyses were consistent with the idea that young adults had greater trial-by-trial agenda-driven modulation of activity (i.e., greater selectivity) than did older adults in representational regions. Thus, under selective remembering conditions where older adults showed clear differential regional activity in representational areas depending on type of test, they also showed evidence of disrupted frontal and parietal function and reduced item-by-item modulation of test-appropriate features. This pattern of results is consistent with an age-related deficit in the engagement of selective reflective attention. Author Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Yale University P.O. Box 208205, New Haven, CT 06520-8205, United States
  • Ngôn ngữ: English
  • Số nhận dạng: ISSN: 0028-3932

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