skip to main content
Ngôn ngữ:
Giới hạn tìm kiếm: Giới hạn tìm kiếm: Dạng tài nguyên Hiển thị kết quả với: Hiển thị kết quả với: Chỉ mục

Perceived volume, expected satiation, and the energy content of self-selected meals.(Report)

Brunstrom, Jeffrey M. ; Collingwood, Jane ; Rogers, Peter J.

Appetite, August, 2010, Vol.55(1), p.25(5) [Tạp chí có phản biện]

ISSN: 0195-6663

Toàn văn sẵn có

Trích dẫn Trích dẫn bởi
  • Nhan đề:
    Perceived volume, expected satiation, and the energy content of self-selected meals.(Report)
  • Tác giả: Brunstrom, Jeffrey M. ; Collingwood, Jane ; Rogers, Peter J.
  • Là 1 phần của: Appetite, August, 2010, Vol.55(1), p.25(5)
  • Mô tả: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2010.03.005 Byline: Jeffrey M. Brunstrom (a)(b), Jane Collingwood (a), Peter J. Rogers (a) Keywords: Portion size; Expected satiation; Associative learning; Perceived volume; Energy intake; Variance partitioning; Energy density; Expected satiety Abstract: Self-selected meals tend to be consumed in their entirety. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the cognition associated with meal planning. Previously, we have shown that expected satiation is an excellent predictor of the energy content of self-selected meals. In the present study we sought to quantify the extent to which this relationship is mediated by differences in the perceived volume of foods (compared calorie-for-calorie). Testing took place at lunchtime. For nine highly familiar foods, participants (N =60) selected a momentary 'ideal' portion, and then completed separate assessments of their expected satiation and perceived volume. Regression analysis revealed that expected satiation explained 74.8% of the variance in the energy content of self-selected meals (kcal) (p <0.004). Of this, only 31% was shared with perceived volume, indicating that volume influences portion-size decisions by moderating expectations around satiation. However, a larger proportion of the variance (43.8%) can be considered 'unique' and independent of the perceived physical dimensions of the foods. We suspect that this contribution reflects the effect of prior learning, based on actual satiation that has been experienced in the past. Author Affiliation: (a) University of Bristol, England, UK (b) Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK Article History: Received 3 November 2009; Revised 2 March 2010; Accepted 7 March 2010 Article Note: (footnote) [star] This work was supported by a grant from the BBSRC DRINC initiative (reference BB/G005443/1).
  • Ngôn ngữ: English
  • Số nhận dạng: ISSN: 0195-6663

Đang tìm Cơ sở dữ liệu bên ngoài...